Housing White Paper – A Dissappointment

Three Radical Housing Network members respond to the Housing White Paper:

“The HWP is a huge disappointment, tinkering round the edges while London’s housing system burns. The Government needs to get real, stop listening to the Developer-lobby and put plans in place to fix our broken housing system. Until they recognise that the only way to solve the housing crisis is by massive public investment in public rental housing, affordable to people and families on low incomes, the housing crisis is only going to get worse.

In London more people in poverty live in the private rented sector than any other tenure, enduring the worst renters rights in Europe, and being squeezed by private landlords for most of their income. And the government and taxpayer spends billions subsidising this insanity through housing benefit, driven by a blind commitment to a free market in housing. The case for council housing – economically, socially and politically – is overwhelming, and yet this Housing White Paper continues to fiddle with the dials, expecting a different outcome. It’s beginning to look like the Government doesn’t care.”

“Today’s statements on ‘housing market failure’ not only fail to acknowledging the severity of a housing crisis that traps millions in poverty, but betray the free-market thinking of the Conservative’s solutions which lies at the root of the problem. This is not a case of ‘market failure’ but of four decades of political failure, which has seen Neoliberal governments allow a wealthy few to exploit the housing of many for personal profits. Any serious attempt to address this must – as a bare minimum  – introduce  immediate rent controls and a moratorium on evictions, with a long-term program of community-led, fully-funded social housing construction to return this basic human right to democratic control”

‘It’s good that the government is being forced to bend to campaign pressure and is making more u-turns on last years ridiculous Housing and Planning Act. But we need more than policy sound bites. We need decisive action to repeal the 2016 Act, to control rents and invest in a new generation of first class council housing for rent.’

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